Spread the Word – Taste & Tour of Cheshire Bridge 2013 – Oct. 9

TNT2013You may or may not think of Cheshire Bridge Road as a foodie destination or the ideal location for taste and tour event, but coming in 1 week will be the Taste & Tour of Cheshire Bridge 2013.  Truth is, the corridor is not only known for its strip clubs and sex shops, but it has a number of good restaurants and retailers that have had rave reviews over the years.  Spread the News and support Cheshire Bridge businesses in a positive way.
Participating Merchants & Hours:
Ghion Cultural Hall & California Mart – 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Nino’s Italian Restaurant – 5:30 PM – 11:00 PM Nakato’s Japanese Restaurant – 5:30 PM – 10:00 PM New Baby Products – 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM Antiques & Beyond – 11:00 AM – 7:00 PM Taqueria del Sol – 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM & 5:30 PM – 9:00 PM The Colonnade – 5:00 PM – 9:00 PM Habersham Gardens – 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM Alfredo’s Italian Restaurant – 5:00 PM – 11:00 PM **Ursula’s Cooking School – 3:00 PM – 8:00 PM** Johnny’s New York Style Pizza – 11:00 AM – 11:00 PM Return to Eden – 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM **These merchants will be giving out free samples..
No need to buy tickets. Simply visit your favorite participating merchants throughout the event day and spend money! Buy merchandise and/or order from their regular menus. Have lunch, then browse the stores, have cocktails at one, appetizers  at another, main course at another, and dessert at yet another. These  merchants will donate a percentage of their daily sales (5%-20%) to the  event. Be sure to thank our merchants for their participation!
Proceeds from the event will be shared between Lindbergh LaVista Corridor Coalition (LLCC) and the Marcus Autism Center.
From Midtown Patch: http://midtown.patch.com/groups/business-news/p/spread-the-word–taste–tour-of-cheshire-bridge-2013–oct-9

One Stop Shop Taking Shape on Cheshire Bridge Road

Dennis Tomlinson plans to open what he envisions as a general store of sorts at the corner of Cheshire Bridge and LaVista Roads in the former Ace Hardware. The as yet unnamed new store will be a little bit of everything and has been in the works since January. The space, roughly 7000 square feet, will be part barter, part furniture re-finishing and is nearly 100% repurposed or reused materials, aside from three newly installed windows in the front of the space.
Tomlinson is friends with Paul Brown at Gallery 63 in Sandy Springs as well as Rick Dale of Las Vegas-based Rick’s Restorations. Brown’s Gallery 63 is featured in Auction Kings on the Discovery Channel while Rick Dale and his restoration business are featured on the hit History Channel show American Restoration. Tomlinson tells me that he has been contacted by the History Channel about the possibility of a show and that this new store will give him the space to possibly do a show in the future.
Personally I’m a fan of stores like this, and am eagerly anticipating the opening. I like the fact that Tomlinson is anti-pawn shop as he sees them as a predatory business and says it’s like their “kicking someone while they’re already down.” Tomlinson’s shop will take in just about anything from anyone so long as there is value and he sees a market for it. Got a “this,” and want a “that,”? Bring it in and he’ll make a deal.
Tomlinson’s recent businesses have been related to the restoration and resale of motorcycles at his shop in Chamblee though he also has experience with eBay as well as furniture restoration, and also recalls having built some of the first Taco Bell and KFC restaurants in the south. Basically, Tomlinson is a jack of all trades and by his own admission, is a collector of everything.
The store is basically fully stocked already, according to Tomlinson. He’s been collecting for years and says among other things, vintage gas pumps, coke machines and motorcycles will be for sale or trade.
On a recent trip to Asheville, North Carolina, I came across a store similar to what Tomlinson is opening called Treasure Hunters. The store, located in Biltmore Square Mall, was a smorgasbord of stuff, with signs posted stating “we buy and sell anything of value.” Tomlinson’s store will be similar, but he plans to have it be a trading post of sorts, with things of more value than the cups and silverware I saw being hawked in Asheville.
It’s likely the store will be named something along the lines of “One Stop Shop,” and if successful, Tomlinson hopes to expand into the adjacent former Happy Herman’s space, another 7,000 square feet. This space would be dedicated to higher end merchandise, he says, whereas the Ace space will be more general merchandise. The current space will receive a vintage looking mural on the LaVista Road side and the Cheshire Bridge entrance will come to resemble a fire station.
Store one has been a labor of love since the lease was signed in January, and has included many 12 or 14 hour workdays. As of now, the store should open by early November. Tomlinson anticipates opening as many as twenty additional stores in the coming years, in smaller towns outside of Atlanta.
from Tomorrow’s News Today – Atlanta

City, Neighbors Have Long Discussion Over Sewer Tank

ByEden Landow
The city of Atlanta, under the gun to meet a federal court-ordered consent decree deadline to substantially improve its wastewater management infrastructure, is trying a third time to build a massive storage tank somewhere near the confluence of the south and north forks of Peachtree Creek, but once again running into neighborhood concerns.
Neighbors turned out last week for a meeting at Rock Springs Presbyterian Church to find out more about the project and voice their concerns, which included security, odor, effect to property values, unsightliness, sewer gas odors and unforeseen problems.
They complained the community is “taking one for the team” by being unduly impacted with massive projects, including the Ga. 400 interchange, Clifton Corridor rail construction, Georgia Power Co.  transmission lines — and now this water-management project.
“What is our neighborhood doing to get in exchange for this,” some asked.
The project is about 60 percent through the design stage and would include building one 10-million gallon, raised overflow tank off Cheshire Bridge Road at 2061 Liddell Drive. The tank would be about 55 feet tall and 185 feet wide, with a pumping station and electrical station on the flood plain at 2001 Cheshire Bridge Rd., near the north end of Lenox Road.
Plans call for tunneling diluted sewage overflow under Cheshire Bridge Road to the Liddell Road tank when the main system is overcapacity, which is usually about once a month, said EDT Waterworks principal engineer Donald Fry, who explained the project in a slideshow presentation.
By email, Lindbergh-Lavista Corridor Coalition board member Courtney Harkness said, “The City of Atlanta has a decision to make: Does it want to redevelop the Cheshire Bridge corridor or does it want to make the area an industrial dumping ground? If the City goes forward with this sewer project off of Cheshire Bridge Road, we will know what path they have chosen.”
Fry said the city needs to do something to protect the creeks and environment and that the city believes this is the best and most cost-effective way to do it.
The project is estimated to cost about $35 million.
“We selected the center of the only commercial and industrial area in the vicinity,” Fry said.
The project, sited on city-owned land, will effectively double the capacity of the current flow. He said the project is not foreseen to ever have more tanks, though he said the site is large enough for  a second one.
The city initially planned to build the overflow tanks off Zonolite Road, then relocated the project off Kay Lane. Both locations were taken off the table after residents and business owners fought against building the project.
According to Sharon Matthews, senior watershed director for the city of Atlanta, to comply with the consent decree, the city must have construction completed in June 2014 and that construction would begin on this facility around the first of the year.
Harkness said the group is concerned the city’s 1999 Cheshire Bridge redevelopment plan would be jeopardized.
“This is the future Cheshire Bridge neighborhood, a multi-ethnic community that integrates open-air shopping, dining and entertainment with new residential development,” Harkness said. “A 55 ft. x 185 ft. sewer tank that will only be used, by the City’s estimation, for four to six hours each month to handle sewer overflow, at a cost to taxpayers of nearly $40 million, does not jibe with this redevelopment plan at all.”
Area residents, who worked to get the City to develop this plan in 1999 and then again to get the City to rezone Cheshire Bridge Road to Neighborhood Commercial (NC) zoning in 2005, feel abandoned by the City and its leadership with the proposal of this sewer tank project, she said.
Matthews said the tank can be built with architectural features and landscaping so that it will not diminish the looks of the community.
Harkness said the community feels the “burden of achieving clean water is being ‘dumped’ on in  this area of town, even though the issue affects a much larger area. They feel that other neighborhoods and jurisdictions (Buckhead, DeKalb County) that are affected by Peachtree Creek should also have to come to the table to solve this issue.”
“The only positive part of this project is that it (supposedly) will keep sewer run off out of Peachtree Creek,” Harkness said. “However, area residents feel that the burden of achieving clean water is being ‘dumped’ on this area of town, even though the issue affects a much larger area.”
An initial community meeting was cancelled last month “due to issues that have to be addressed with internal stakeholders.”
To read the entire article and add your comments, go to the Virginia-Highland/Druid Hills Patch by clicking on this link:
http://vahi.patch.com/articles/city-neighbors-have-long-discussion-over-sewer-tank

Sewer Tanks May Affect All Three LLCC Neighborhoods

This graphic represents a similar tank system in Gwinnett County. Remember that DWM is proposing two of these on the Liddell Drive site.
This tank is painted with a forest scene to help disguise it.

 
The City of Atlanta (COA) Department of Watershed Management (DWM) is planning on building an overflow sewage capacity system in the Lindridge Martin Manor and Morningside Lenox Park neighborhoods. DWM plans to locate two 10-12 million gallon tanks which will stand 15-30 feet above ground on their property at 2061 Liddell Drive NE, off Cheshire Bridge Road behind Barking Hound Village MAP . The mechanicals i.e. pumping station, electrical station etc. will be located on the flood plain property at 2001 Cheshire Bridge Road NE MAP which is currently owned by Salem Broadcasting where the transmission towers are located.
In the event of overcapacity in the main trunk, a tunneled pipe would carry diluted sewage overflow under Cheshire Bridge Road through active pumping to the above ground tanks on the Liddell property, and as capacity in the main trunk dissipated, would then release the overflow back into the main trunk through gravity flow.
This graphic represents the possible coverage of any odor discharge, based on prevailing wind patterns of southwest to northeast.
Plans do call for odor control measures to be put into place.
Click image to enlarge.

Despite its COA location, given the direction of prevailing winds there is the potential for impact in neighboring DeKalb County as well. To learn more, plan to attend a public meeting hosted by DWM on Wednesday, May 30th at 6:30 pm at Rock Springs Presbyterian Church located at 1824 Piedmont Avenue NE MAP .

Strip Club Fights to Keep Liquor License

By Jaclyn Hirsch for Virginia-Highland/Druid Hills Patch
A strip club on Chesire Bridge Road is fighting to save its liquor license.
Owners of Bliss, an all-male strip club on Cheshire Bridge Road, filed a request to appeal the revocation of the liquor license for the business, according to an announcement at Monday’s meeting of Neighborhood Planning Unit-F.
City of Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed revoked the liquor license in December after the Atlanta License Review Board unanimously recommended to void the license. The Lindridge Martin Manor Neighborhood Association also opposed re-issuing the license to the business.
But according to Monday’s announcement, the business can continue to serve alcohol until the issue is heard.
The neighborhood group was unhappy with the announcement and plans to keep a close eye on the issue.
After a business owner files a liquor license application, the owner  presents the application to the neighborhood civic association, the  neighborhood planning unit and the license review board, which is run by  the Atlanta police department.
If the neighborhood groups deny the license, the applicant still continues forward to the license review board.
The final step for approval or denial rests in the hands of the Mayor.
Past violations
The Lindridge Martin Manor Neighborhood Association sent a letter to Reed in October that outlines the past violations at the business and asked him to revoke the license.
In October 2009, Atlanta police raided the club after a five-month investigation, the group said in the letter to Reed.

The following information outlined below was either published in the  Atlanta Journal- Constitution or by the Fulton County District  Attorney’s office.

  • According to the Fulton County District Attorney’s office, between  May 13, 2009 and Oct. 17, 2009, Atlanta Police conducted an in-depth  undercover investigation. Investigators were able to purchase cocaine,  MDMA, and other illegal narcotics from employees of the club, as well as  being solicited for sex acts by the employees. Additionally, several of  the employees were not licensed by the city. The investigation resulted  in a 32-count indictment of 18 individuals, all employees of the  establishment.
  • Atlanta Police officers obtained 43 arrest warrants and arrested 29 people during a Saturday morning raid in 2009.
  • Police reports released to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution showed  that employees and others at the nude dancing club offered cocaine,  marijuana and prostitution.
  • APD booked the general manager, a floor manager, a bartender, and 16  dancers into the Fulton County jail, according to the report.
  • Floor manager was arrested after officers found 23.4 grams of  packaged marijuana on the floor between him and customer, the report  states.
  • Sixteen of the 20 dancers did not have permits, according to the  report. Several of the dancers told police that management told them  they didn’t need permits. Two dancers also had outstanding warrants for  theft and failure to appear, according to the report.
  • The bartender also didn’t have a permit to sell alcohol, police said.
  • Police said they also found a 19-year-old, who tested positive for  alcohol, with a drink in his and in the VIP room. He also gave police a  fake ID.
  • Officers seized marijuana, cocaine, pills, used condoms, cash and a stolen car from the club.

In October 2006, the license review board found the club guilty of  selling alcohol to minors and staying open too late. The board suspended  Bliss’ liquor license for six months.
“Having a liquor license is a privilege not a right and our community  expects those who hold liquor licenses within this city to be familiar  with and abide by its Alcohol Code,” the letter said. “Failure to do so  should result in harsh penalties, particularly when these are such  egregious and repeated failures. Our community grows weary of the  continued disregard for this City’s Alcohol Code at this location.”
Bliss is located at 2284 Cheshire Bridge Rd., across the street from Landmark Diner.

Iconic Adult Store on Cheshire Bridge Closes

from Patch
A legendary adult entertainment store on Cheshire Bridge Road will close its doors for the last time on Thursday.
The owner of Poster Hut, an adult entertainment shop with a 40-year history in the city, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that rent and the economy made it tough to stay in business.
“Maybe if we had a website we could have survived,” owner Mike Abbott told the AJC. “I had a guy who’s been saying for four years he was going to do it but he never did.”
Abbott, who bought the store four years ago, said he received the final eviction notice last week.
Though Cheshire Bridge is known for strip clubs and adult stores, residents in surrounding neighborhoods have pushed to bring in more sophisticated businesses.
from AJC
The limp economy will accomplish what many a vice agent could not, shuttering the city’s most iconic adult entertainment emporium after 44 years.
The owner of the Poster Hut, where many Atlantans of a certain age bought their first suggestive bumper sticker, bong, fake piece of vomit, or adult, uh, euphemism, blamed the store’s demise on his failure to keep up with the rent — and the times.
“Maybe if we had a website we could have survived,” said Mike Abbott, who bought the store four years ago, just before the financial meltdown. “I had a guy who’s been saying for four years he was going to do it but he never did.”
Alas, the Poster Hut, located smack dab in the middle of Atlanta’s most notorious addresses on Cheshire Bridge Road, was never able to advertise its recent designation as a “great place to buy underwear,” according to a blog dedicated to men’s undergarments.
Abbott was given his final eviction notice last week, leaving him little time to advertise a going-out-of-business sale.  But word has spread throughout the day, attracting “a lot of people in their 40s who were teenagers when they first came here,” said Abbott, who remembers his first time fondly.
“I had heard Alicia Bridges (of “I Love the Nightlife” fame) was working here and, sure enough, there she was behind the counter,” said the native Atlantan, now 51. Bridges was perfectly pleasant, Abbott recalled, which bears notice since the disco star’s stint as a store clerk came well after she topped the music charts.
The Poster Hut will close for good Thursday at 9:30 p.m., though Abbott said “I don’t ever turn anyone away.”
Better hurry — the double entendres are going fast.

APD Zone 2 Expansion Takes Place Tuesday

The Atlanta Police Department’s city beat realignment, which adds three beats to Zone 2, takes effect at 3 a.m. Tuesday.
Zone 2, which includes Buckhead, will take in two beats from the Morningside neighborhood and Cheshire Bridge Road corridor and form a Lenox Square and Phipps Plaza “super beat” for a total of 13 beats, an increase in territory from 36.1 to 39.5 square miles.
The expansion, delayed to ensure enough police academy graduates, will add 12 beats across the city, for a total of 78, according to a statement from the APD.
“Our ultimate goal is to ensure that the only difference our constituents notice is an improvement in service,” said Atlanta Police Chief George Turner in the announcement. “Some officers were stretched too thin, and we believe this redesign will provide relief to those officers. Meanwhile, the addition of new beats will assist greatly in ensuring adequate response to 911 calls.”
Zone 2 Commander Maj. Robert Browning told NPU-A last week he has received 15 to 18 additional officers to handle the extra territory and has suffiicent resources. Browning has noted that Zone 2 previously included the Morningside and Cheshire Bridge beats.
“Some zones are taking on new territory, while others are shrinking areas they will have to cover,” police spokesman Carlos Campos said in a statement. “The result is a redistributed workload that ensures officers across the six zones are able to respond to 911 calls, while also proactively working their beats to reduce crime. This beat redesign will ultimately make our 911 system even more efficient in reducing response time for Atlanta Police officers.”
Police officers and 911 dispatchers “have been trained on the boundaries of the new beats to ensure a seamless transition,” Campos said.
Campos said the city has added 477 new officers since Mayor Kasim Reed took office in January 2010. So far this year, the department has added 218 to the force

by Louis Mayeux for Buckhead Patch

Atlanta Police Preparing for Beat Redesign

from Virgina Highland-Druid Hills Patch
Officers in the Atlanta Police Department have started to prepare for the beat redesign that is tentatively set for December.
No official date has been set for the restructuring of police beats city-wide, but zone two commander Robert Browning told residents Tuesday night that officers in zone two and zone six have started to discuss the plan to move the Morningside and Cheshire Bridge Road areas into the zone two boundaries.
Zone six officers currently patrol Morningside and Cheshire Bridge Road.
Browning said the department needs to hire more officers before the redesign can be completed, but in the meantime, officers have started to familiarize themselves with the new territory.
“I’m very familiar with that area,” Browning said Tuesday night at a public safety town hall meeting in Virginia-Highland. “I’m looking forward to getting back in there and dealing with some problems in that area.”
Morningside and Cheshire Bridge were part of zone two roughly 10 to 12 years ago, he said.
“As you know most criminals kind of have an area they like to hang out in,” Browning said. “Our officers are already talking to the zone six officers and familiarizing ourselves with some of the criminals in that area.”
The Atlanta police department began to discuss re-structuring the police beats last year and held several public hearings to give residents a chance to voice concerns and opinions. The decision to move certain areas into new zones was based on call volume and reported crimes in each area.
Zone two, the largest zone in the city, will take on three additional beats after the redesign — Morningside, Cheshire Bridge Road and part of Lenox and Phipps, which will be split into two beats.
“Because zone two is growing…to be able to staff it correctly, we have to have a certain number of officers assigned to the zone,” Browning said. “Right now, we are just a little bit short. We just haven’t had enough people graduate out of the academy.”
Atlanta police department spokesman Carlos Campos said Wednesday the department graduates officers from the academy monthly and the depertment hopes to have the redesign complete sometime in December.
“We are basically dotting some “i”s and crossing some “t”s,” Campos told Patch. “We have to make sure everything is a go, and we are in the process of doing that.”
He said the department will notify Atlanta residents when they are ready to roll out the beat redesign.

Perkins+Will Hired to Provide Technical & Strategic Expertise

By Jane P. Rawlings, LLCC Transportation Coordinator

 

Heather Alhadeff, Senior Transportation Planner

The Lindbergh LaVista Corridor Coalition is pleased to once again engage the services of Perkins+Will’s Urban Design practice and their Senior Transportation Planner, Heather Alhadeff. Ms. Alhadeff is uniquely positioned to offer expert, independent analysis on the current Clifton Corridor proposals. This consulting work will begin immediately, and continue on a contractual basis.
Our Board of Directors has committed the necessary initial funding, while also reaching out to other impacted parties in order to help offset the costs involved. We’re seeking assistance, and would be pleased for you to consider making your own special contribution at this time of $10, $50, or $100.
Donations are 100% tax deductible, and can be made online through our PayPal secure website by clicking here.
Donate Now
Don’t have a PayPal account? Look for this wording on the left side of the donation page, “Use your credit card or bank account,” and click Continue.

Community Input Sought at Clifton Corridor MARTA Workshop

By Margarita Delapaz for the North Druid Hills/Briarcliff Patch

The Clifton Corridor Transit Initiative Project continues to be worked out in partnership with MARTA. As part of a requirement to receive federal funding, an analysis was presented to the community for input.
Residents gathered at the Torah Day School of Atlanta Wednesday night to express concerns and get clarification on the proposed Clifton Corridor Transit Initiative project.
The project is a partnership with MARTA and the Clifton Corridor Transit Management Association which would bring new transportation options linking the Centers for Disease Control, Emory University and DeKalb Medical to Atlanta’s regional mass transit system.
After a brief introduction, participants were asked to go around the displays asking questions, examining their options and voicing their opinions about the project.
Jeremy Freeman said he lives off Lenox Circle where he fears a light rail may be the choice for the area behind his house.
“First and foremost they should be talking to residents because they’re concerned and don’t know what’s happening in their neighborhood,” he said.
There are three proposed options with different track locations. Heavy rail operates underground like current MARTA trains. Bus rapid transit would operate similar to the design of express buses in New York City. Designated lanes, high speeds and pre-paid fare speed up the process. Finally, the option Freeman fears, a light rail, would operate similar to a streetcar, above ground.
“They’re not telling you that this has to be 100 feet from CSX lines,” Freeman said.
Because CSX owns and operates freight trains along the existing tracks in the neighborhood, the proposed rail transit option may not use those same lines. In addition, new rail lines may not even be in close proximity to existing lines per federal regulations. This distance may mean the difference between having a train in your backyard or not.
Business owner John Cyphers said the proposal would have a train on top of his business which he feels would affect traffic flow.
“They’re going to take over my property,” he said.
After clarification and further examination of the proposal, it was shown that plans actually hope to utilize heavy rail in the option. This would mean an underground alternative that would not cut through Cyphers’ lot.
This discussion was the ultimate goal of the meeting, said Jason Morgan, a regional planner for MARTA.
“Those that live next to CSX are worried about their property and those a couple of blocks away are worried about access,” Morgan said.
Although the project would not break ground for at least six years, the ultimate goal of the analysis is to get comment and feedback for route options.
“This is Stage 1,” he said. “We don’t know the kind of technology yet or how to position the stations.”
If all goes as planned, Morgan said the lines may be available to commuters as early as eight years from now.