DeKalb reports major sewage spill near Emory Briarcliff Campus

By Megan Matteucci
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
DeKalb County officials say 12,600 gallons of raw sewage spilled near Emory University’s Briarcliff Campus off Briarcliff Road on Thursday, 9 December 2010.
A sewer pipe under Hancock Drive in Briarwood Hills burst, spilling the untreated sewage into a tributary of Peachtree Creek behind the college’s Briarcliff campus (formerly GA Mental Health Institute), according to DeKalb watershed management records.
On Monday, the federal Environmental Protection Agency issued a consent decree, mandating DeKalb do $700 million in sewer upgrades. The county has reported more than 800 raw sewage spills in five years.

Jason Stephenson Named Volunteer of the Year for 2010

 
Receiving 52% of the votes cast online by our members, Jason was named Volunteer of the Year for 2010 at our Annual Meeting on 11 November.
Jason has served on the Board of Directors for the past two years as Treasurer. He has also worked on the Marketing Committee, the Membership Committee, the Grant Writing Committee, the ESL Program Steering Committee, the Meadow Loop Trail, and the Communications Committee as Newsletter Editor. Jason recently represented LLCC as a co-presenter at the Neighborhood Summit sponsored by the Community Foundation of Metro Atlanta.
Jason lives in the East Lake Community, but until recently lived in the LaVista Walk complex in Lindridge Martin Manor for 2.5 years. He is employed as Director of Youth Ministries at Westminster Presbyterian Church on Sheridan Road in LaVista Park.

The Voyager on Peachtree Creek

David R. Kaufman’s journey down Atlanta’s forgotten waterway
This report was prepared by Ken Edelstein, with assistance from Joeff Davis, Samantha Simon and Tammy Vinson. Online production by Alejandro Leal.
John Wesley Powell had the Colorado. Lewis and Clark explored the Missouri. For Henry Morton Stanley, it was the Nile.
David R. Kaufman set his sights a bit more modestly. Since he moved to Atlanta as a kid in 1971, Kaufman wanted to uncover the mysteries of Peachtree Creek, a neglected stream that drains the northern half of Atlanta.
Now he’s completed his voyage of discovery. Throughout the 1990s – sometimes with a friend, most often alone – Kaufman descended the North and South forks of Peachtree Creek, as well as some of its tributaries.
What he found by canoe and on foot, and what he recorded with a 4-by-5 camera, was a stream whose rich history and natural beauty has largely been pushed aside by roads, buildings, garbage, pollution – by a city that turned its back on what could be a magnificent resource. Yet remnants of that history and beauty remain. 
Kaufman shares his journey in a book, Peachtree Creek: A Natural and Unnatural History of Atlanta’s Watershed (University of Georgia Press, 2007).
Here are some photos and excerpts. 
Next

5% Day at Whole Foods Market Briarcliff

 

Shop for a cause at Whole Foods Market Briarcliff! On Wednesday, June 30, Whole Foods Market will donate 5% of their net sales to the Lindbergh LaVista Corridor Coalition. Funds will be used for the continual development of the Confluence Trail system along the North and South forks of Peachtree Creek. Stop by the Briarcliff location to show your support and help raise important funds for the LLCC!

LLCC & GIS

This Thursday evening, 13 May, we will hold our next LLCC General Membership Meeting. It will begin at 7:00 PM with David Green (Perkins+Will) presenting our new Geographic Information System (GIS). David will give us a brief introduction to GIS technology, introduce our customized system, and explain how this tool will be used in evaluation of the Blueprints Study recommendations and our future planning efforts. What makes our system unique is that it is customized for the LLCC community, spanning the jurisdictional lines between the City of Atlanta and unincorporated DeKalb County.
OK, so you are asking yourself, “What is GIS and how can I use it?”
A geographic information system (GIS) integrates hardware, software, and data for capturing, managing, analyzing, and displaying all forms of geographically referenced information.
GIS allows us to view, understand, question, interpret, and visualize data in many ways that reveal relationships, patterns, and trends in the form of maps, globes, reports, and charts.
A GIS helps you answer questions and solve problems by looking at your data in a way that is quickly understood and easily shared. We plan to share ours on our website.
In addition to basic demographic data, we hope to displace crime stats, flood plains, zoning, property ownership, tax valuation, real estate trends, traffic patterns, just to name a few. While you are viewing this presentation, we hope you will share with our design team data you would like to see tracked and displayed as well.
To find out more about GIS, in a clear, concise format, visit www.gis.com.
Our meeting will be held in the Fellowship Hall of Westminster Presbyterian Church, 1438 Sheridan Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30324.

Cub Scouts help clean up creek

Rich Sussman
Rich Sussman, LLCC Environment Coordinator
from Rich Sussman
March 20, more than 35 Cub Scouts and parents from packs in Garden Hills and Toco Hills attacked the exotic plants and picked up trash on the Meadow Loop Trail along the North Fork of Peachtree Creek. This was the second time the scouts helped clean up the trail. Thanks to them and many neighbors, you can now walk the entire loop starting from the two exposed manholes to the overpass and then back along the stream to Lindbergh. Lots of that nasty kudzu, privet, multiflora roses and honeysuckle have been cut down, pulled up, and eliminated from the meadow. During the two workdays, nearly 20 bags of trash were collected along with tires, chairs, mattresses and a steel ammo box. As soon as Georgia DOT gives its permission, we will erect a sign heralding the trail as part of a longer trail system along the North and South Forks of Peachtree Creek. As the weather is finally brightening and getting warmer, please take the opportunity to stroll the trail – and feel free to pick up some trash during your walk!
See our website (www.lindberghlavista.org) to view more photos from this event.